(via Mystery Watercolor Update « The Drayton Hall Diaries)
(via Museum Focus: Drayton Hall by Staff from Antiques & Fine Art magazine)
In the mid-1980s, Mr. Simmons was asked to help repair the iron railings on the land and riverfront steps during a stabilization effort of the stone steps and landings. He repaired and even in some places, replaced, sections of the railing. But that work was not his first encounter with Drayton Hall. As a young man, he knew many of the African Americans that then lived at Drayton Hall, including Richmond Bowens, who he recalled as a close friend. After Drayton Hall opened as historic site, and Richmond Bowens worked as the gatekeeper, Mr. Simmons would sometimes drive out to the site, to see and talk with Mr. Bowens, and reflect on the times and people they knew. (via Remembering a Master: Philip Simmons, 1912-2009 « The Drayton Hall Diaries)

In the mid-1980s, Mr. Simmons was asked to help repair the iron railings on the land and riverfront steps during a stabilization effort of the stone steps and landings. He repaired and even in some places, replaced, sections of the railing. But that work was not his first encounter with Drayton Hall. As a young man, he knew many of the African Americans that then lived at Drayton Hall, including Richmond Bowens, who he recalled as a close friend. After Drayton Hall opened as historic site, and Richmond Bowens worked as the gatekeeper, Mr. Simmons would sometimes drive out to the site, to see and talk with Mr. Bowens, and reflect on the times and people they knew. (via Remembering a Master: Philip Simmons, 1912-2009 « The Drayton Hall Diaries)

lowcountrydigitallibrary:

On July 8, 1776, the Liberty Bell toll gathered citizens to hear the first public reading of the Declaration of Independence.
The Old Liberty Bell, Independence Hall, Philadelphia, Pa.
“Title and “80 (9648)” on label.”
Slide from the Keystone View Company Lantern Slides held by the College of Charleston Libraries.

lowcountrydigitallibrary:

On July 8, 1776, the Liberty Bell toll gathered citizens to hear the first public reading of the Declaration of Independence.

The Old Liberty Bell, Independence Hall, Philadelphia, Pa.

Title and “80 (9648)” on label.”

Slide from the Keystone View Company Lantern Slides held by the College of Charleston Libraries.

lowcountrydigitallibrary:

On June 30, 1936, Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell, was published. The manuscript would later become a popular film in 1939.
See more!
“Georgetown County, Annandale Plantation, ca. 1791. Main House - View of SW (Front and Side) elevation. West wing is a 20th Century addition. 4” x 5” B/W photo.”
Photograph from the Charles N. Bayless Photos of Charleston and Georgetown County, S.C. held by The Charleston Archive at CCPL.

lowcountrydigitallibrary:

On June 30, 1936, Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell, was published. The manuscript would later become a popular film in 1939.

See more!

Georgetown County, Annandale Plantation, ca. 1791. Main House - View of SW (Front and Side) elevation. West wing is a 20th Century addition. 4” x 5” B/W photo.”

Photograph from the Charles N. Bayless Photos of Charleston and Georgetown County, S.C. held by The Charleston Archive at CCPL.

TBT 1974
Frances Edmonds, then president of Historic Charleston Foundation, with Vice President and Mrs. Gerald Ford and Senator Ernest Hollings at Drayton Hall during the Foundation’s campaign with the National Trust to acquire the property. 

TBT 1974

Frances Edmonds, then president of Historic Charleston Foundation, with Vice President and Mrs. Gerald Ford and Senator Ernest Hollings at Drayton Hall during the Foundation’s campaign with the National Trust to acquire the property. 

"The visit to Drayton Hall reminded me, once again, of the power of place and of the power of story,” said Dr. Bell. “The house is unfurnished, and the ravages of time, and a little vandalism, are evident. It is not lushly furnished with objects from the period, objects that might have nothing to do with Drayton Hall’s story, nor with the stories of its family. Instead, the visitor encounters a haunting framework for many stories about the Drayton family and the slaves who lived in that place with them, stories that stretch across more than two centuries. Drayton Hall allows the visitor to create his or her own vision of life on a place, and in an era far removed from our own. Although Drayton Hall is empty and silent, the sights, sounds, smells, and daily tragedies, more than two centuries gone, come alive in the imagination of the visitor at Drayton Hall."

Dr. Ford W. Bell Discusses Future of Museums at Drayton Hall « The Drayton Hall Diaries

America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places has identified more than 250 threatened one-of-a-kind historic treasures since 1988.

(Source: youtube.com)

"This place matters."

— The National Trust for Historic Preservation (via gatrust)